New York City and Westchester County Water Threatened By PFAS Chemicals with Guests George Klein (member of Sierra Club’s Lower Hudson Group) and Richard Ruge (Civil Engineer and Water Treatment Expert)

Clean and safe water is a right for every Earthling on the planet. It is a very divisive political issue in countries, cities, towns and municipalities around the globe. On average, one individual human uses between 135 and 140 liters of water per day. Water is vital for all life, as no other molecule matches water when it comes to properties that support life. We must work to keep our drinking water free of toxins and chemicals, which is why we have to protect watersheds and water quality buffer areas in order to provide safe drinking water to the populous. Adverse environmental impacts affect communities, and on this episode of TMSOG, we talk about a water filtration plant set to be constructed and placed next to Westchester County Airport, which is a local airport in a suburb of NYC. Recently the Westchester County Board of Legislators approved a land swap that provides a 13.4-acre parcel to Westchester Joint Water Works (WJWW) that is adjacent to the airport. There continues to be strong opposition to construction of the facility, partly because the plant will be within the Kensico watershed. This watershed area is in close proximity to the airport where contaminated groundwater is being monitored and treated for assorted toxic chemicals including polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Recently, the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized the first-ever federal limits on toxic PFAS in drinking water, establishing the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) of 4 parts per trillion (ppt) for the two most widely-detected PFAS chemicals, PFOA and PFOS. The EPA’s limits are now stricter than the 10 parts per trillion that is the current standard in New York State.

We talk to George Klein and Richard Ruge who are opposing the building of the water filtration plant so close the the Kensico watershed area near Westchester County Airport. George Klein has worked with the Sierra Club nationally and locally on issues of environmental sustainability since 1989. He is currently an activist with the Sierra Club’s Lower Hudson Group, which covers Westchester, Rockland and Putnam counties. The Lower Hudson Group works on local environmental issues, such as the climate emergency, limiting the impact of Westchester County Airport, the safe decommissioning of Indian Point Nuclear Plant and education and outreach programs. Richard Ruge has been working in the public water supply field for 40 years. He has a degree in civil engineering and holds a Grade 1B water treatment license from the NYS DOH.  He was Chair, Vice Chair and Treasurer of the  Westchester Water Works Conference and was a Trustee at Large for the New York Section of the American Water Works Association. For more info and to find ways to take action go to https://www.sierraclub.org/atlantic/lower-hudson

To listen to past TMSOG shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow The Many Shades of Green on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to TMSOG podcasts on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

TMSOG is proud to be on Feedspot’s list of the 50 Best Environmental Podcasts to follow in 2024 https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

Blackbirds Singing in the Dead of Night and How Wildlife Mammas Connect with Nature to Raise their Babies with Co-Founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, Victoria Alzapiedi

I was thinking about the podcast topics for this weeks’s episode of TMSOG while walking my Diva poodle Sparkles and I saw a number of blackbirds flying from tree to tree, and communicating with each other with loud screeches. It got me thinking about birds and what they do in the dead of night, as well as how they protect their young. It also got me thinking about the tune Blackbird, which most of us thought was about birds. As it turns out, we were wrong, as the lyrics of Blackbird by Paul McCartney were not actually written about blackbirds. The tune was written about the integration of schools across the American south during the civil rights era in the 60s. More specifically, Sir Paul was inspired by the images of the Little Rock 9 in Arkansas, being assaulted and jeered by an angry mob. It seems that the US has been consumed by angry mobs for centuries, including today, as angry mobs mixed with peaceful protesters converge on many college campuses, but that’s a topic for another time. Paul McCartney met two of the women who were part of the Little Rock 9, Mothershed and Eckford, at his Little Rock concert on April 30, 2016. He took to Twitter after the meeting to say, “Incredible to meet two of the Little Rock Nine–pioneers of the civil rights movement and inspiration for Blackbird.” It’s a wonderful example of music as a message, and we need more more songs like that right now. Since Mother’s Day is almost upon us, Victoria Alzapiedi, our resident garden, wildlife and healthy yards guru discusses the connection with wildlife mammas and their coexistence with nature. Malcolm chimed in with a spider story, so we chat about insects as well. Victoria is a co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, and is a member of the Town of New Castle Conservation Board. She is a member of Friends of Buttonhook, which is working to save a 20.3 acre forrest in the Town of New Castle. In addition, Victoria is the co-founder of the New Castle Pollinator Pathways Coalition, and started the Facebook group “The Nature of Westchester” an active community of nature lovers which now has more than 4000 members. She is also a Native plant gardening consultant and coach providing eco-friendly planting recommendations, visit her website mynativegardenoasis.com for more information. Also check out New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook and help save a forest at https://www.preservebuttonhook.org/ Visit https://www.audubon.org/ for great info on birds.

To listen to past TMSOG shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow The Many Shades of Green on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to TMSOG podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

TMSOG is proud to be on Feedspot’s list of the 50 Best Environmental Podcasts to follow in 2024 https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

Building a Bridge: Garden & Music Connections and Butterfly Wings with Educator, Gardener & Musician Paul Clarke

We are in Earth month, Spring is in the air, music’s in the air and cherry blossoms are putting on a show. The trees and bushes are sprouting their light green buds and we are surrounded by Mother Earth’s beauty. Animals and birds scurry about for food, picking at the ground for insects and seeds. The ecosystems are working in harmony and concurrent to this, Community and school gardens are gearing up to start planting for the season. According to the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture, research shows school gardens have a positive impact on student learning, health, and nutrition. Gardening helps students become more engaged, as it is an immersive experience which teaches them valuable skills while establishing a greater sense of community. Our guest on this episode is Paul Clarke, a retired Special Ed teacher in NYC for over 25 years, who now works part-time as the Garden Coordinator of the Vito Marcantonio Community Peace Garden, an ongoing project he brought to life originally at P. S. 50, now Central Park East II. Paul is also a life-long song writer, and he calls his genre Theatrical Pop with Conscience. Before he began teaching, Paul participated in Music Under New York, an MTA-sponsored program that promotes subway musicians. He also wrote and performed musicals with homeless New Yorkers via a not-for-profit Manhattan community outreach program. We play his tune Build A Bridge, which has beautiful music and lyrics. Paul believes that beauty, nature, and kindness are powerful healers in our broken world. For more info go to paulclarkesongs.com. To get additional info about school gardens in NYC go to GrowNYC.org. To listen to past TMSOG shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow The Many Shades of Green on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to TMSOG podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

TMSOG is proud to be on Feedspot’s list of the 50 Best Environmental Podcasts to follow in 2024 https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

Unpave the Parking Lot and Put Up a Paradise– Plus Tips for taking action on Climate Change. Do Something! Make a Difference! Get Great info from Victoria Alzapiedi, Co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards

“I’m convinced that, powered by hope and fueled by courage and anger, we have the power to transform our collective future.” Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, atmospheric scientist and Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy.

      In an interview with Aspen Ideas on March 8th of this years, Dr. Katharine Hayhoe discussed tips for talking about climate change and what might be done to combat climate issues. She said that “climate change is not only an environmental issue — it’s an everything issue. It affects the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat. It puts our homes and our health at risk.”  Katharine Hayhoe further stated that when people ask me “What can I do about climate change? I don’t respond with a prioritized list of actions to cut your carbon footprint. Instead,  I say talk about it — where you live, where you work, where you study. Help people understand why it matters to them, and what we can do together to make a difference.” We must use our collective will to help us rise up to keep the conversation about the environment in the forefront, because there is no Planet B.  Our resident garden, wildlife and healthy yards guru Victoria Alzapiedi gives us great information about what we can do within our communities to raise awareness about environmental issues, and the importance of taking action to help implement policies and laws that will help reduce our carbon footprint. Education and messaging are key to creating a cleaner and healthier landscape. Victoria is a co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, and is a member of the Town of New Castle Conservation Board, as well as the Climate Smart Communities Task Force. She is also a member of Friends of Buttonhook, which is working to save a 20.3 acre forrest in the Town of New Castle. In addition, she is the co-founder of the New Castle Pollinator Pathways Coalition, and started the Facebook group “The Nature of Westchester” an active community of nature lovers which now has more than 4000 members. Victoria is also a Native plant gardening consultant and coach providing eco-friendly planting recommendations (mynativegardenoasis.com). For more info check out New Castle Healthy Yards and The Nature of Westchester on Facebook, as well as The Nature Conservancy (preserve.nature.org). For past programs go to HudsonRiverRadio.com, Malcolmpresents.com and themanyshadesofgreen.com. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to the podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoconsciousness

TMSOG is proud to be listed in the number 8 spot on Feedspot’s 50 Best Environmental podcasts to follow in 2024- https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

The Woolly Bear Caterpillar and other Winter Wildlife with Victoria Alzapiedi, Co-Founder of New Castle Healthy Yards (S12 E1)

Bears have tucked themselves away as winter is upon us. When the weather outside is frightful, most of us choose to spend most of our time indoors. Animals, however, don’t exactly have a choice. So what do our furry and non-furry friends do when it is frigid and snowy? Some animals migrate to warmer climates, particularly birds, while others have to adapt and get through the bad weather. Some animals, like Da bears, hibernate, and go into a very  deep sleep.  Other animals like Chipmunks (ALVIN!) eat a lot in the fall to store fat in their bodies and intermittently slow down their breathing. Survival is not easy, but many animals adapt and manage to get through the frigid winter months (chipmunks, bears and skunks). Then there is the Woolly Bear Caterpillar, which has even been known to survive an entire winter completely frozen in an ice cube. As far as the woolly bear caterpillar’s travel goes, they are simply moving about in search for that perfect spot to curl up and spend the winter. With climate change and warmer temperatures, animals will have to readjust, adapt and create new habits and habitats. We need to be proactive in creating habitats in our own backyards to support the needs of wildlife.  Victoria Alzapiedi our resident garden, wildlife and healthy yards guru gives us great info about winter wildlife and what we can do to preserve ecosystems in the winter. Victoria is a co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, and is a member of Friends of Buttonhook, which is working to save a 20.3 acre forrest in the Town of New Castle. She is also the founder of My Native Garden Oasis which provides ecosystem garden coaching and consulting to create habitat for pollinators, birds and wildlife. Follow New Castle Healthy Yards and My Native Garden Oasis on Facebook. For more TMSOG podcasts go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Subscribe to TMSOG on all major podcast apps, and check us out on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

It’s A Wrap 2023 with the Fab 4 George Polisner, Neil Richter, Rusti Wolintz and Malcolm Burman

The lyric of the chorus of the song California Reggae Debate/ You’ve Got the Power, written and performed by my Token Bro now in Rock n Roll Heaven, Mitch Margo, points to the power we have, which we must use our highest potential. We must create a world where the collective will thrives, to keep the planet from imploding. Collective will is crucial to perpetuate the greater good! There were many things to be happy about in 2023, and many things that were truly horrible. While words are important, actions in most cases, speak louder than words, and we need be more proactive in making the planet a greener and safer place to live and thrive. The lyrics below of California Reggae Debate are great words to follow:

You’ve go the power, I’ve seen you use it

You think you don’t have it, that’s how you lose it!

The Fab 4, George Polisner, Neil Richter, Rusti Wolintz and Malcolm Burman join me (Maxine Margo Rubin), in discussing what made us happy, what pissed us off in 2023, and what we hope to see in the coming New Year. There are more of us doing good and making a difference. The Press, seems to hightlight the evil, and that has to change. For more info go to Civ.Works, and for current and past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow The Many Shades of Green (TMSOG) on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Please subscribe to TMSOG podcast on Spotify, Apple, Amazon, iHeart, Spreaker.com and more. You’ve Got The Power, I’ve Seen You Use It, You Think You Don’t Have It, That’s How You Lost it! SO USE THE POWER YOU HAVE #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

Farm Aid 2023, Support Local Farms, Help Our Farmers with Allison Turcan Founder of DIG Farm and host of the podcast Getting Dirty

“Family farmers have the solutions to some of our toughest challenges. As we face a changing climate, farmers in Indiana, across the Midwest and all over the country are farming in ways that create more resilient farms to build healthy soils and protect our water.” — Willie Nelson Farm Aid

The development of agricultural took place about 12,000 years ago and changed the way humans lived. The nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle switched to permanent settlements and farming. The earliest farmers lived in the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East (near what is now Turkey) and grew crops like peas, lentils and barley. As humans learned to control their sources of food, they no longer had to be nomads, as they could settle in one place.  Forward to 2023, and there are 2 million farms in America, 98% of which are operated by families, family partnerships or family corporations. Farmers are the backbone of America, as they provide food for the citizens of the US and the globe. But more than 9,000 farms were lost between 2021 and 2022.  Data from USDA’s Economic Research Service indicates that Michigan led the list with 1,700 fewer farms, Texas lost a thousand, and Kansas fell 900. California, Kentucky, and New Mexico each lost 600 farms, and there were 500 fewer farms in Nebraska. Farmers play an integral role in feeding the populous, and many need economic assistance to keep afloat. Small farms are an important part of the agricultural system, as they promote locally grown food which brings communities together. Our guest on this episode is Allison Turcan, a Farmer and the Founder of DIG Farm, a local farm in North Salem, NY. Allison recently attended the Farm Aid event in Noblesville, Indiana and met with farmers, organizers and some legendary music artists. She is the host and producer of the podcast Getting Dirty on HRR, and she works with Westchester Land Trust as the farmer for their food bank garden. I am proud to call her my friend:) For more info go to farmaid.org, Digfarm.org, Homegrown.org. For more shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. TMSOG is available on all major podcast apps (Spotify, Apple, Amazon, iHeart, Spreaker.com and more). Follow us on Facebook and Instagram @tmshadesofgreen #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

To Squish or not to Squish? The Spotted Lanternfly is invading our yards, parks, forests and more. Is squishing them the only answer?

We are now confronted with yet another plague in a sense, in the form of the Spotted Lanternfly (SLF), which is invading yards, parks, golf courses, vineyards, outdoor concert venues and more. Many folks don’t know how to deal with them. According to the NYS Department of Agriculture, the Spotted Lanternfly is a plant hopper native to China and Southeastern Asia. Discovered in Pennsylvania in 2014, the Spotted Lanternfly presents a threat throughout much of the United States. While its list of hosts is large, the greatest agricultural concern falls on grapes, hops, apples, blueberries, and stone fruits. So yes, you might need to begin worrying about enjoying that tall mug of your favorite IPA Beer and that glass of Cabernet Sauvignon. Its presence has led to crop loss, exporting issues, and increased management costs. Egg masses may be transported unknowingly (including on cars), and their nymphs are able to feed on many hosts. Adult SLFs prefer certain trees such as Tree of Heaven, Black Walnut, Maples, and Grapevines. To say the least, this bug is of great concern in the burbs and beyond, and our resident garden and environmental guru Victoria Alzapiedi gives us some great info on the Spotted Lanternfly and what measures we can take to reduce their population. For more info go to https://agriculture.ny.gov/spottedlanternfly. Follow New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook. Find past TMSOG episodes on HudsonRiverRadio.com, MalcolmPresents.com and on all major podcast apps (Spotify, Apple, Amazon, iHeart, Spreaker.com and more). #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

Kitchen Table Democracy, A Win in Montana and Will Bikini Beach Clean-up Ever Be a Thing?

Julia Olson, the chief legal counsel and executive director for Our Children’s Trust, the group behind a climate lawsuit in Montana, called the recent decision by Judge Seeley a precedent and “a sweeping win” for Montana, the youth plaintiffs, and the climate, and said more court victories would be coming. “For the first time in U.S. history, a court ruled on the merits of a case that the government violated the constitutional rights of children through laws and actions that promote fossil fuels, ignore climate change laws, and disproportionately imperil young people,” Olson said. Around the globe, youth is rising as Gen Zs are starting to make their presence known in both the legal and political arenas. Claire Vlases was 17 years old when she became a plaintiff in the Montana case. Now 20 and working as a ski instructor, she said “climate change hangs over every aspect of her life.

On this episode George Polisner, founder of Civ.Works, who is our resident political, eco and social justice expert gives us some insight into political, environmental, social issues and current events. How can we better speak to each other over the kitchen table? We also jokingly banter back and forth (as I also did with Charlotte Ghiorse in a previous podcast), about whether starting a ‘Bikini Beach Clean-Up’ would entice more people to help clean beaches while getting the message out about climate change. It does sound like a silly idea, but could it work??

For more info go to Civ.Works, and for past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and MalcolmPresents.com. Follow TMSOG on FB and on Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Subscribe to The Many Shades of Green podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

“The Birds” We have to do more than watch the birds, we need to Protect them! Victoria Alzapiedi co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards gives us some important information how we can help safeguard the dwindling bird population.

We are seeing a meltdown of bird populations” says Ariel Brunner, director of BirdLife Europe and Central Asia, a conservation NGO. Loss of habitats, the rising use of pesticides on farms, and, yes, climate change—these are among the factors to blame. Even if you are not a birdwatcher, the loss of birds impacts you. Birds regulate ecosystems by preying on insects, pollinating plants, and spreading seeds. We rely on healthy ecosystems for breathable air, the food we eat, and a regulated climate.” That quote by Ariel Brunner is from an on-line article by Chris Baraniuk (June 28, 2023) in Wired Magazine, which further goes on to say that fewer birds are around today than half a century ago. The numbers are startling. There are  73 million fewer birds in Great Britain alone than there were in 1970. Europe has been losing around 20 million every year, says Vasilis Dakos, an ecologist at the University of Montpellier in France—a loss of 800 million birds since 1980. And in the US, just shy of 3 billion individual birds have disappeared in only 50 years with 389 species of birds on the brink of extinction. This is a crisis, and not enough is being done to get this information out. People need to get out of their bubble and start paying attention to what is happening to Earth’s species which are vanishing. The disappearance of birds is staggering! Our resident wildlife, garden and habitat guru, Victoria Alzapiedi, co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, gives us some great info about our need to protect birds. For more info go to audubon.org and follow New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook. Check out past shows on HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Subscribe to TMSOG podcast on all major podcast apps and follow us on Facebook and Instagram @tmshadesofgreen. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

A Big Green Office Plant, plus Rotational Grazing, Regenerative Farming and some Sexy Astrology with Charlotte Ghiorse

From office plants to meadows to farming, we must work to be resilient and sustainable and help things grow in a more environmentally friendly manner. There is a newer method of farming called Regenerative farming, which is an approach to agriculture that focuses on restoring and improving the health of the soil, enhancing biodiversity, and promoting long-term sustainability. It is often considered a holistic and ecological approach to farming. The movie Biggest Little Farm and GrassRoots Farmers Co-op give insight into the practice of regenerative farming as a more sustainable way to grow produce, raise animals and be better stewards of the land. Regenerative farming involves agricultural methods that are more sustainable and work to heal the land and soil. Farmers and ranchers grow a diversity of plants and trees, establish cover crops and use no-till methods for planting, and incorporate grazing animals that naturally produce compost. We talk with our resident artist, eco-activist, Sexy astrologist Charlotte Ghiorse about the rotational and regenerative farming and agriculture practices that are used on some farms and ranches to bring more sustainability to the land. We also chat about a famous office green plant and play Mitch Margo’s tune ‘Green Plant’ (#TheTokens) plus July’s astrology chart and Charlotte’s upcoming art projects/shows. For more info go to https://www.houseofchoclet.com/ and check out Charlotte’s Facebook and Youtube pages Sexy Astrology. For past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow TMSOG on Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Subscribe to The Many Shades of Green podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

The Dangers of Lawn Pesticides

“A Who’s Who of pesticides is therefore of concern to us all. If we are going to live so intimately with these chemicals eating and drinking them, taking them into the very marrow of our bones — we had better know something about their nature and their power.” Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson is known as the woman who challenged the notion that humans could obtain mastery over nature by using chemicals. Her sensational book Silent Spring (1962) warned of the dangers to all natural systems from the misuse of chemical pesticides such as DDT, and questioned the scope and direction of modern science, which would lead to the initiation of the contemporary environmental movement. I don’t think that Rachel would be happy with today’s overuse of pesticide chemicals in lawn treatment, which threaten native flowers and grasses by harming beneficial pollinating insects as well as wildlife, our dogs and cats and yes, us humans. Of 40 most commonly used lawn pesticides, 26 are linked with cancer or carcinogenicity, 12 are linked with birth defects, 21 with reproductive effects, 32 with liver or kidney damage, 24 with neurotoxicity, and 24 with disruption of the endocrine (hormonal) system. Of those same 40 lawn pesticides, 21 are detected in groundwater, 24 have the ability to leach into drinking water sources, 39 are toxic to fish and other aquatic organisms vital to our ecosystem, 33 are toxic to bees, 18 are toxic to mammals, and 28 are toxic to birds. With numbers like this, the only logical question becomes: is this really necessary and what can we do to stop or prevent this kind of contamination, and what are the alternatives? Our resident wildlife, garden and habitat guru, Victoria Alzapiedi, co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, gives us some great info about pesticides and why we need to talk more about the risks of chemical use on our property. For more info go to beyondpesticides.org and follow New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook. For past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Please subscribe to TMSOG on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness