Blackbirds Singing in the Dead of Night and How Wildlife Mammas Connect with Nature to Raise their Babies with Co-Founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, Victoria Alzapiedi

I was thinking about the podcast topics for this weeks’s episode of TMSOG while walking my Diva poodle Sparkles and I saw a number of blackbirds flying from tree to tree, and communicating with each other with loud screeches. It got me thinking about birds and what they do in the dead of night, as well as how they protect their young. It also got me thinking about the tune Blackbird, which most of us thought was about birds. As it turns out, we were wrong, as the lyrics of Blackbird by Paul McCartney were not actually written about blackbirds. The tune was written about the integration of schools across the American south during the civil rights era in the 60s. More specifically, Sir Paul was inspired by the images of the Little Rock 9 in Arkansas, being assaulted and jeered by an angry mob. It seems that the US has been consumed by angry mobs for centuries, including today, as angry mobs mixed with peaceful protesters converge on many college campuses, but that’s a topic for another time. Paul McCartney met two of the women who were part of the Little Rock 9, Mothershed and Eckford, at his Little Rock concert on April 30, 2016. He took to Twitter after the meeting to say, “Incredible to meet two of the Little Rock Nine–pioneers of the civil rights movement and inspiration for Blackbird.” It’s a wonderful example of music as a message, and we need more more songs like that right now. Since Mother’s Day is almost upon us, Victoria Alzapiedi, our resident garden, wildlife and healthy yards guru discusses the connection with wildlife mammas and their coexistence with nature. Malcolm chimed in with a spider story, so we chat about insects as well. Victoria is a co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, and is a member of the Town of New Castle Conservation Board. She is a member of Friends of Buttonhook, which is working to save a 20.3 acre forrest in the Town of New Castle. In addition, Victoria is the co-founder of the New Castle Pollinator Pathways Coalition, and started the Facebook group “The Nature of Westchester” an active community of nature lovers which now has more than 4000 members. She is also a Native plant gardening consultant and coach providing eco-friendly planting recommendations, visit her website mynativegardenoasis.com for more information. Also check out New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook and help save a forest at https://www.preservebuttonhook.org/ Visit https://www.audubon.org/ for great info on birds.

To listen to past TMSOG shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow The Many Shades of Green on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to TMSOG podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

TMSOG is proud to be on Feedspot’s list of the 50 Best Environmental Podcasts to follow in 2024 https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

Cellophane Bees, Mountain Mints, Albert Einstein and conversations about the Importance of Native plants with artist and Master Gardner Donna Sharrett

Spring is upon us, we can feel it in the air, we can see it in the colors, but there is something wrong with this picture, as our ability to enjoy this lovely time of year as new life sprouts up, has an ominous side…. Leaf Blowers!  Yes, the roar of leaf blowers and mowers fill the air, and yellow signs dot the roadways warning us to stay off the lawn for at least 24 hours so that the pesticides can seep in. Yup, Spring is here, and simultaneous to buds and flower petals popping up across the landscape, the pollinators are losing their battle with humans as pesticides, the mow and blow mentality and habitat loss are causing their population to decrease in record numbers. We revel in the rebirth of the land, and while the song Live for Today by the Grassroots tells us to ” live for today, and don’t worry ’bout tomorrow,” these times demand that we have to worry about tomorrow and take action to make things better. Beauty is all around us, and people are tending to lovely gardens and planting shrubs and trees to maintain a park like feeling, which Doug Tallamy calls the Home Grown National Park Movement. We have to stop and smell the roses, and let the bees and insects do their thing as keystone species, which are responsible for sustaining ecosystems around the globe. In the online article via nrdc.org/stories titled A World Without Bees? Here’s What Happens If Bees Go Extinct, it stated that  Albert Einstein was sometimes quoted as saying, “If the bee disappears from the surface of the earth, man would have no more than four years to live.” While the quote has not been confirmed, there is truth in that statement. So with that in mind, let us look at how we can grow gardens, plant more native plants and stop using pesticides and leaf blowers which kill pollinators. Our guest on this episode is Donna Sharrett, who is an amazing artist and Master gardener. She gives us some great information about pollinators and how to maintain a healthy garden and lawn. Donna’s artwork has been exhibited at numerous venues including the U.S. Embassy, Bangladesh; the Bronx Museum of the Arts, the Katonah Museum of Art, the John Michael Kohler Institute, Sheboygan, WI and many more. Donna is also a member of the planning board in the town of Ossining, NY. Her home garden will be featured on the Garden Conservancy Tour next month. Go to (https://www.gardenconservancy.org/) for get information.

For more information about Donna’s art and garden go to DonnaSharrett.com, and for past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow The Many Shades of Green (TMSOG) on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to TMSOG podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

TMSOG is proud to be on Feedspot’s list (at number 8) of the 50 Best Environmental Podcasts to follow in 2024 https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

Unpave the Parking Lot and Put Up a Paradise– Plus Tips for taking action on Climate Change. Do Something! Make a Difference! Get Great info from Victoria Alzapiedi, Co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards

“I’m convinced that, powered by hope and fueled by courage and anger, we have the power to transform our collective future.” Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, atmospheric scientist and Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy.

      In an interview with Aspen Ideas on March 8th of this years, Dr. Katharine Hayhoe discussed tips for talking about climate change and what might be done to combat climate issues. She said that “climate change is not only an environmental issue — it’s an everything issue. It affects the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat. It puts our homes and our health at risk.”  Katharine Hayhoe further stated that when people ask me “What can I do about climate change? I don’t respond with a prioritized list of actions to cut your carbon footprint. Instead,  I say talk about it — where you live, where you work, where you study. Help people understand why it matters to them, and what we can do together to make a difference.” We must use our collective will to help us rise up to keep the conversation about the environment in the forefront, because there is no Planet B.  Our resident garden, wildlife and healthy yards guru Victoria Alzapiedi gives us great information about what we can do within our communities to raise awareness about environmental issues, and the importance of taking action to help implement policies and laws that will help reduce our carbon footprint. Education and messaging are key to creating a cleaner and healthier landscape. Victoria is a co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, and is a member of the Town of New Castle Conservation Board, as well as the Climate Smart Communities Task Force. She is also a member of Friends of Buttonhook, which is working to save a 20.3 acre forrest in the Town of New Castle. In addition, she is the co-founder of the New Castle Pollinator Pathways Coalition, and started the Facebook group “The Nature of Westchester” an active community of nature lovers which now has more than 4000 members. Victoria is also a Native plant gardening consultant and coach providing eco-friendly planting recommendations (mynativegardenoasis.com). For more info check out New Castle Healthy Yards and The Nature of Westchester on Facebook, as well as The Nature Conservancy (preserve.nature.org). For past programs go to HudsonRiverRadio.com, Malcolmpresents.com and themanyshadesofgreen.com. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to the podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoconsciousness

TMSOG is proud to be listed in the number 8 spot on Feedspot’s 50 Best Environmental podcasts to follow in 2024- https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

Leap Year, ‘Big Nights’ for Frogs Leaping towards their Vernal Pools and Keystone Plants with Victoria Alzapiedi, Co-founder, New Castle Healthy Yards

We are now in a leap year which happens every four years, and it exists, for the most part to keep the months in sync with annual events, including equinoxes and solstices. According to the JPL (Jet Propulsion Lab), it is a correction to counter the fact that Earth’s orbit isn’t precisely 365 days a year. When we think of a Leap year, we think of presidential elections in the US and the Summer Olympics. Spring is now approaching and everyone is becoming more aware that the climate is changing, and that the seasons are starting earlier. Hibernating animals and insects are getting more confused and are waking from their hibernation earlier. Kermit and his friends are finding it harder to be green. During this time of year ‘Big Nights’ occur when frogs and salamanders wake from hibernation to get to vernal pools to lay eggs and mate. Unfortunately, many are killed by cars as they cross roads. The NY DEC (dec.ny.gov) has a volunteer training programs which trains people to help the frogs and salamanders cross roadways get to their vernal pools. This program can also be used for people in other states to help save the lives of these precious amphibians. Our resident garden, wildlife and healthy yards guru Victoria Alzapiedi, gives us great info about Big Nights, and she also talks about the importance of Keystone plants, and what we can do to preserve ecosystems in the coming months. For more info check out New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook. Go to Scenic Hudson for additional information:

https://www.scenichudson.org/viewfinder/gearing-up-for-amphibians-big-night and https://dec.ny.gov/nature/waterbodies/oceans-estuaries/hudson-river-estuary-program/conservation-and-land-use-program/amphibian-migrations-and-road-crossings and https://www.vernalpool.org/

Link to program NYDEC https://meetny.webex.com/recordingservice/sites/meetny/recording/dbb3114db3fb103cbfbe005056816f6f/playback

https://dec.ny.gov/nature/waterbodies/oceans-estuaries/hudson-river-estuary-program/conservation-and-land-use-program/amphibian-migrations-and-road-crossings

For past TMSOG shows go to https://hudsonriverradio.com/the-many-shades-of-green.html, Malcolmpresents.com and follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to The Many Shades of Green on all major podcast apps (Apple, Amazon, Spotify, Spreaker.com and more). TMSOG is proud to be on Feedspots list of the 50 Best Environmental podcasts to follow in 2024 @ #8 https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

#Raise Your Eco-Consciousness

Groundhog Day, Climate Change, PETA and Purple Haze with Rusti Wolintz

It’s official: spring is right around the corner.Punxsutawney Phil DID NOT SEE HIS SHADOW in front of thousands of spectators at Gobbler’s Knob in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, part of the annual Groundhog Day tradition celebrated in the U.S. and Canada. That means, according to the legend, we’re in for an early spring. Phil predicted an early spring for the 21st time since records were kept. (USA Today 2.2.24) The question arises as to how climate change will affect future Groundhog Day predictions.

Having attended the Groundhog festivities on 02.02.02, with my guest and BFF Rusti Wolintz, on this episode we discuss our Bucket List adventure to Punxsutawney, which was quite the time. As the crowd screamed PHIL! PHIL! PHIL! in frigid temperatures, we watched the ceremony unfold as the Groundhog Inner Circle took Phil out of his hollow tree stump to predict the weather. We are now in 2024, and while most people depend on the more advanced methods of their favorite meteorologist, we still wake up on Groundhog Day to the tune of ‘I Got You Babe’ and travel in our minds to the **Tip Top Cafe in the Groundhog Day movie (that’s for you Mr. Murray), to find out if the prediction of the groundhog, through some telepathic connection with humans, will determine if there will be six more weeks of winter, or if spring will come early. If he sees his shadow after coming out of his hollow, there will be six more weeks of winter, and if he does not see his shadow, people can expect spring to be around the corner. In essence we put Phil, Staten Island Chuck, and General Beauregard Lee the premier groundhog prognosticators, in the limelight to predict the weather, which as we all know has been more extreme. So in addition to predicting the shifting of seasons, Phil and company now have another challenge: climate change. We already know that across the U.S., spring is getting warmer and it is starting an average of three days earlier too. Spring is usually upon us when small leaves begin to sprout on trees, but in recent years, spring leaf out arrived in the Southeast over three weeks earlier than the long-term average (1981-2010) in some locations. Austin, TX is 10 days early, Jackson, MS and Charleston, SC are 17 days early, and Wilmington, NC is 22 days early. Warmer springs can cause plants to bloom earlier, impact migrating species and hibernating animals, and increase the amount of seasonal insects. We must address global warming and take action to reduce greenhouse gases. To get more info go to NASA.gov, nationalgeographic.org, NOAA at climate.gov and groundhog.org,

For past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com, Malcolmpresents.com, plus themanyshadesofgreen.com. Follow TMSOG on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Listen to the TMSOG podcast on Spotify, Apple, Amazon, iHeart, Spreaker.com and more. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness. The Many Shades of Green is honored to be on the Feedspot list of top environmental podcasts at number 8: https://podcasts.feedspot.com/environmental_podcasts/

**Correction, during the episode it was stated that the Groundhog Day movie had the Tik Tok Diner, when it was the Tip Top Cafe.

The Woolly Bear Caterpillar and other Winter Wildlife with Victoria Alzapiedi, Co-Founder of New Castle Healthy Yards (S12 E1)

Bears have tucked themselves away as winter is upon us. When the weather outside is frightful, most of us choose to spend most of our time indoors. Animals, however, don’t exactly have a choice. So what do our furry and non-furry friends do when it is frigid and snowy? Some animals migrate to warmer climates, particularly birds, while others have to adapt and get through the bad weather. Some animals, like Da bears, hibernate, and go into a very  deep sleep.  Other animals like Chipmunks (ALVIN!) eat a lot in the fall to store fat in their bodies and intermittently slow down their breathing. Survival is not easy, but many animals adapt and manage to get through the frigid winter months (chipmunks, bears and skunks). Then there is the Woolly Bear Caterpillar, which has even been known to survive an entire winter completely frozen in an ice cube. As far as the woolly bear caterpillar’s travel goes, they are simply moving about in search for that perfect spot to curl up and spend the winter. With climate change and warmer temperatures, animals will have to readjust, adapt and create new habits and habitats. We need to be proactive in creating habitats in our own backyards to support the needs of wildlife.  Victoria Alzapiedi our resident garden, wildlife and healthy yards guru gives us great info about winter wildlife and what we can do to preserve ecosystems in the winter. Victoria is a co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, and is a member of Friends of Buttonhook, which is working to save a 20.3 acre forrest in the Town of New Castle. She is also the founder of My Native Garden Oasis which provides ecosystem garden coaching and consulting to create habitat for pollinators, birds and wildlife. Follow New Castle Healthy Yards and My Native Garden Oasis on Facebook. For more TMSOG podcasts go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Subscribe to TMSOG on all major podcast apps, and check us out on Facebook, Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

Climate Scientist and Organic Chemist Stacy Morgan talks about Climate Change, Mothers Out Front, Renewable Heat Now, and Buttonhook Forest

I used to say, when I was talking about climate change, that climate change is serious, certain, and soon. But this is no longer accurate. Now it is very serious, very certain, and now.”(Posted August 9, 2021 Sci-Line (sciline.org) Linda O. Mearns, Ph.D. Senior scientist, Research Applications Lab, National Center for Atmospheric Research 

 We need to listen to the scientists, and take heed before it’s too late. So on this episode we talk to scientist Stacy Morgan, who gives us some important information and her thoughts on the climate crisis and how organizations  like Mothers Out Front and Renewable Heat Now are putting solutions into place that can help reduce CO2 emissions. Community involvement on a local level is crucial to getting things done. Stacy is an organic chemist, and she became interested in climate science while working at the National Physical Laboratory in London. She lives in Northern Westchester with her family and is a core member of Friends of Buttonhook Forest, which is group of community residents who are trying to preserve a magnificent 20.3 acres of land, which contains over 1000 trees, is a wildlife habitat and contains Native American Sacred Ceremonial Stones.  Stacy is working hard to save this diverse and important carbon sink and she continues to educate and engage the community in protecting this amazing land. To contact Stacy go to Instagram @savebuttonhook and follow Save Buttonhook on Facebook. Also go to mothersoutfront.org and renewableheatnow.org. For past shows go to HudsonRiverradio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow us on Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Subscribe to the TMSOG podcast on Amazon, Apple, Spotify, iHeart and more. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

Farm Aid 2023, Support Local Farms, Help Our Farmers with Allison Turcan Founder of DIG Farm and host of the podcast Getting Dirty

“Family farmers have the solutions to some of our toughest challenges. As we face a changing climate, farmers in Indiana, across the Midwest and all over the country are farming in ways that create more resilient farms to build healthy soils and protect our water.” — Willie Nelson Farm Aid

The development of agricultural took place about 12,000 years ago and changed the way humans lived. The nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle switched to permanent settlements and farming. The earliest farmers lived in the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East (near what is now Turkey) and grew crops like peas, lentils and barley. As humans learned to control their sources of food, they no longer had to be nomads, as they could settle in one place.  Forward to 2023, and there are 2 million farms in America, 98% of which are operated by families, family partnerships or family corporations. Farmers are the backbone of America, as they provide food for the citizens of the US and the globe. But more than 9,000 farms were lost between 2021 and 2022.  Data from USDA’s Economic Research Service indicates that Michigan led the list with 1,700 fewer farms, Texas lost a thousand, and Kansas fell 900. California, Kentucky, and New Mexico each lost 600 farms, and there were 500 fewer farms in Nebraska. Farmers play an integral role in feeding the populous, and many need economic assistance to keep afloat. Small farms are an important part of the agricultural system, as they promote locally grown food which brings communities together. Our guest on this episode is Allison Turcan, a Farmer and the Founder of DIG Farm, a local farm in North Salem, NY. Allison recently attended the Farm Aid event in Noblesville, Indiana and met with farmers, organizers and some legendary music artists. She is the host and producer of the podcast Getting Dirty on HRR, and she works with Westchester Land Trust as the farmer for their food bank garden. I am proud to call her my friend:) For more info go to farmaid.org, Digfarm.org, Homegrown.org. For more shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. TMSOG is available on all major podcast apps (Spotify, Apple, Amazon, iHeart, Spreaker.com and more). Follow us on Facebook and Instagram @tmshadesofgreen #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

It’s Autumn so it’s time to Leave Leaves Alone and use more sustainable practices to prep your lawn. Victoria Alzapiedi Co-Founder of New Castle Healthy Yards gives great info as to why fake Halloween Spider Webs are not environmetally friendly and how window decals can help migratory birds.

F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, “Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.”

It’s that time of year when the air cools and you start feeling that autumn vibe. Feeling the chill on your face brings relief from the hot days of summer, (2023), which by the way, was the hottest summer ever recorded. So with the arrival of Fall, Squirrels and Chipmunks start darting around to gather acorns for their survival of the winter months. Birds get ready to migrate south to warmer climates, and Bears get ready to peace out a bit and hibernate. The trees put on a show of magical colors and leaves pile up to become rich compost in the spring and summer. Us humans need to be proactive in this autumn dance and take steps to help wildlife and take care of our landscape so that we can work in balance with nature. We can be proactive to help birds along their migratory path by keeping lights off and putting decals on windows to prevent them from crashing into window panes. We can leave leaves alone and let them nourish the earth to settle into compost. Halloween in almost upon us and we should be cognizant of using decorations which could hurt wildlife, particularly fake webs which can entangle birds, insects and other animals. Our resident wildlife, garden and habitat guru, Victoria Alzapiedi, co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards gives us helpful info and tips about best practices for being one with the beauty of Autumn. For more info follow New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook, check out the National Wildlife Federation at nwf.org, the Audubon Society at act.audubon.org and leaveleavesalone.org. For past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Subscribe to The Many Shades of Green podcast on all major podcast platforms. Follow us on FB and Instagram @tmshadesofgreen. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

“The Birds” We have to do more than watch the birds, we need to Protect them! Victoria Alzapiedi co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards gives us some important information how we can help safeguard the dwindling bird population.

We are seeing a meltdown of bird populations” says Ariel Brunner, director of BirdLife Europe and Central Asia, a conservation NGO. Loss of habitats, the rising use of pesticides on farms, and, yes, climate change—these are among the factors to blame. Even if you are not a birdwatcher, the loss of birds impacts you. Birds regulate ecosystems by preying on insects, pollinating plants, and spreading seeds. We rely on healthy ecosystems for breathable air, the food we eat, and a regulated climate.” That quote by Ariel Brunner is from an on-line article by Chris Baraniuk (June 28, 2023) in Wired Magazine, which further goes on to say that fewer birds are around today than half a century ago. The numbers are startling. There are  73 million fewer birds in Great Britain alone than there were in 1970. Europe has been losing around 20 million every year, says Vasilis Dakos, an ecologist at the University of Montpellier in France—a loss of 800 million birds since 1980. And in the US, just shy of 3 billion individual birds have disappeared in only 50 years with 389 species of birds on the brink of extinction. This is a crisis, and not enough is being done to get this information out. People need to get out of their bubble and start paying attention to what is happening to Earth’s species which are vanishing. The disappearance of birds is staggering! Our resident wildlife, garden and habitat guru, Victoria Alzapiedi, co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, gives us some great info about our need to protect birds. For more info go to audubon.org and follow New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook. Check out past shows on HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Subscribe to TMSOG podcast on all major podcast apps and follow us on Facebook and Instagram @tmshadesofgreen. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

A Big Green Office Plant, plus Rotational Grazing, Regenerative Farming and some Sexy Astrology with Charlotte Ghiorse

From office plants to meadows to farming, we must work to be resilient and sustainable and help things grow in a more environmentally friendly manner. There is a newer method of farming called Regenerative farming, which is an approach to agriculture that focuses on restoring and improving the health of the soil, enhancing biodiversity, and promoting long-term sustainability. It is often considered a holistic and ecological approach to farming. The movie Biggest Little Farm and GrassRoots Farmers Co-op give insight into the practice of regenerative farming as a more sustainable way to grow produce, raise animals and be better stewards of the land. Regenerative farming involves agricultural methods that are more sustainable and work to heal the land and soil. Farmers and ranchers grow a diversity of plants and trees, establish cover crops and use no-till methods for planting, and incorporate grazing animals that naturally produce compost. We talk with our resident artist, eco-activist, Sexy astrologist Charlotte Ghiorse about the rotational and regenerative farming and agriculture practices that are used on some farms and ranches to bring more sustainability to the land. We also chat about a famous office green plant and play Mitch Margo’s tune ‘Green Plant’ (#TheTokens) plus July’s astrology chart and Charlotte’s upcoming art projects/shows. For more info go to https://www.houseofchoclet.com/ and check out Charlotte’s Facebook and Youtube pages Sexy Astrology. For past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Follow TMSOG on Instagram and Threads @tmshadesofgreen. Subscribe to The Many Shades of Green podcast on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness

The Dangers of Lawn Pesticides

“A Who’s Who of pesticides is therefore of concern to us all. If we are going to live so intimately with these chemicals eating and drinking them, taking them into the very marrow of our bones — we had better know something about their nature and their power.” Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson is known as the woman who challenged the notion that humans could obtain mastery over nature by using chemicals. Her sensational book Silent Spring (1962) warned of the dangers to all natural systems from the misuse of chemical pesticides such as DDT, and questioned the scope and direction of modern science, which would lead to the initiation of the contemporary environmental movement. I don’t think that Rachel would be happy with today’s overuse of pesticide chemicals in lawn treatment, which threaten native flowers and grasses by harming beneficial pollinating insects as well as wildlife, our dogs and cats and yes, us humans. Of 40 most commonly used lawn pesticides, 26 are linked with cancer or carcinogenicity, 12 are linked with birth defects, 21 with reproductive effects, 32 with liver or kidney damage, 24 with neurotoxicity, and 24 with disruption of the endocrine (hormonal) system. Of those same 40 lawn pesticides, 21 are detected in groundwater, 24 have the ability to leach into drinking water sources, 39 are toxic to fish and other aquatic organisms vital to our ecosystem, 33 are toxic to bees, 18 are toxic to mammals, and 28 are toxic to birds. With numbers like this, the only logical question becomes: is this really necessary and what can we do to stop or prevent this kind of contamination, and what are the alternatives? Our resident wildlife, garden and habitat guru, Victoria Alzapiedi, co-founder of New Castle Healthy Yards, gives us some great info about pesticides and why we need to talk more about the risks of chemical use on our property. For more info go to beyondpesticides.org and follow New Castle Healthy Yards on Facebook. For past shows go to HudsonRiverRadio.com and Malcolmpresents.com. Please subscribe to TMSOG on all major podcast apps. #RaiseYourEcoConsciousness