1718 Pesticide Madness

Pesticides are permeating the land, air and water. Our crops and food are sprayed with toxic chemicals which is causing health issues, pollution and collapse of pollinators. We talk to Carey Gillam, author of the new book  Whitewash: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science. Ms. Gillam picks up where Rachel Carson left off with the perils of DDT,  but this time the culprit is glyphosate, the main chemical used in Roundup, produced by Monsanto. We also chat with June Stoyer, host of The Organic View, about neonictinoids, and how it is causing the reduction in the bee population.  We need to work to stop the pesticide madness.

Tune in to find out what the hottest tortilla chip on Earth will do to your digestive system and mouth. It’s the hottest chip on the Scoville heat scale, coming in at 1.92 SHU, a Guinness World Record.

For more information go to U.S. Right to Know: usrtk.org, careygillam.com theorganicview.com, thegreendivas.com and themanyshadesofgreen.com

 

 

 

1717 #StopSucking, Strawless Oceans, and Strawsome

Green Diva Meg and I speak  with Dune Ives, Co-founder of the Lonely Whale Foundation, which has a campaign to reduce how plastic straws find their way into the ocean.  Check out their Strawless Ocean (#StopSucking) campaign.

Plastics wind up in are the ocean via land and are carried by the wind and rain into the sea. Grocery bags, coffee cup lids, plastic bottles, straws and more. We need to work to stop this from happening.

One solution is in the form of glass straws, and we speak to Daedra Surowiec, Founder of Strawsome, which produces beautiful glass straws as an alternative to the polluting plastic version. They even designed a straw for the 50 Shades of Green Divas, called the GD Straw. Details coming soon on how you can purchase them.

Will we be able to get the now crippled EPA to regulate plastics as a pollutant under the Clean Water? Find out by going to:biologicaldiversity.org/campaigns/oceans and getting more info.

For additional info go to: lonelywhale.org, strawsome.com, thegreendivas.com and themanyshadesofgreen.com

 

 

 

1716 Climate Reality, Pachamama, and Climate Hope with guest Elly Lessin

Elly  Lessin has produced many corporate and non-profit events over the last couple of decades, and she has recently switched gears to became a steward of the Earth. She is now a Climate Reality Project Presenter, and she also works with the Pachamama Alliance, which focuses environmental and social issues via the spiritual connection we all have to the earth, and embraces all humanity.  Working with the elders of the Achuar people of the Ecuadorian Amazon, Pachamama  has an unwavering commitment to work together to “change the dream of the modern world.” 

Elly’s  green “ah ha” moment came from her father, via his passion for astronomy and the physical sciences, as well as social justice issues/causes. He loved the cosmos and the magnificence of the Universe. Elly wants to carry on her dad’s visions and love of the earth.  For more information go to climaterealityproject.org, pachamama.org, thegreendivas.com and themanyshadesofgreen.com

 

 

1715 Intimacy with Nature-Tree Girl Julianne Skai Arbor

We enjoy being lost―or perhaps found―in wildness and the grandness of nature. TreeGirl brings us there. In TreeGirl: Intimate Encounters with Wild Nature,  Julianne Skai Arbor, a.k.a. TreeGirl―photographer, certified arborist, conservation educator and forest eco-therapist―invites us into intimate contact with fifty magnificent tree species from her adventures in thirteen countries on four continents. Using a remote-control timer and a tripod, she photographs herself and others in sensual connection with the trees of the world.     For more information go to: treegirl.org

 

1714 Zoe Weil, Institute for Humane Education

Zoe Weil is the co-founder of the Institute for Humane Education, which focuses on problem solving, investigatory skills, and creating solutions to issues of social justice and the environment. Zoe is a Ted speaker, and a teacher who is working to promote education that is kinder, more humane, and helps develop a youth culture that cares about all earthlings and Mother Nature.

The Solutionary Program is a direct response to the pressing and growing issues facing our planet today. Through the program, students are given the skills and motivation to help solve existing global issues, as well as to minimize their contribution to future problems by living as compassionate, collaborative, global citizens.

For more info go to: humaneeducation.org

 

 

 

1713 Project Farmhouse, GrowNYC with guest Amanda Gentile

Our guest this week on 50 Shades of Green Divas is Amanda Gentile of GrowNYC. We discuss Project Farmhouse, a beautiful new LEED certified facility, which brings farming  and sustainable education into the heart of NYC. The space contains a full kitchen, conference area, and it has a Green Hydroponic wall which contains freshly grown herbs and greens. Amanda explains the importance of this new facility, and the need to educate citizens of NYC and beyond, about healthy eating, being more sustainable and practicing the three Rs (reduce, reuse and recycle) within one’s daily routine. Changing our habits just a little bit will make Mother Nature and all Earth’s creatures breathe easier.

For more information go to: projectfarmhouse.org, grownyc.org and thegreendivas.com. Tweet us your thoughts @tmshadesofgreen

 

What’s the Tipping Point for Our Mess

By Susan Lutz

A growing problem in the United Kingdom, and worldwide, is what is called fly-tipping. The intriguing name drew me into the video. Clip after clip showed cars pulling up to spots around the U.K. and dumping their trash, couches, plastic roofing, recycling, and one group of people even dumped dead sheep. All the mess, stink, and trouble left for someone else to clean up. After seeing the video, I felt I’d tipped, as if it was one too many videos about terrible things we’re doing.

I want to care about all our troubles. The disturbing election in the U.S., the terrorist attacks, the rape victims, the dolphins slaughtered and captured, the sharks butchered for their fins, the children taken from their families. After so much, I feel numb, no longer seeing, or feeling, the pain. I only look, a voyeur just scrolling by.

The heavy load of the constant barrage of information weighs me down. Though, it’s not visible on the outside, on the inside, I think my soul is suffering from so much “much.”  The fact that people are dumping trash on other people’s property and country roads and national lands enrages me. I want to scream, donate money, judge, yet, where do I go with that anger? I find myself lost. I feel the whole grow bigger.

I remember those campaigns against littering in the 70s. The roads were dotted with trash, cigarette butts, everything we could toss out a car window or discard while walking. Then, we rallied, we educated, we recycled, and now we find we’re fly-tipping? Letting others take care of our problems passes the buck to no end. There might not be a difference in fly-tipping and creating little plastic coffee cups by the billions to pollute the land for a one-time thrill. The consciousness behind all these acts is meant to quickly satisfy and satiate- to not take responsibility for our choices.

When I lived in Central America, I often heard tourists or expats talking to each other about the shameful way the citizens polluted their lands. Yet, everyday I saw hard working men and women sweeping the streets, earning probably less than $400 a month trying to change things, keeping the land clean. I saw things change. I see them change here too. Then, I see on-line what seems to be this unearthing of non-stop hideous behavior of people hurting each other and the environment. I needed to ask: why keep looking? Is it ever going to change?

I look because in the mess of our humanity, I see warriors of peace, love, kindness, and smarts, all trying to make the world a better place. Just recently, I read France will be banning plastic cutlery, “to promote a ‘circular economy’ of waste disposal, ‘from product design to recycling…’” A rescue organization in India finds desperate animals in dire condition in the street. In a few moments, I can see a transformation from near death to salvation – this with the power of social media.

There’s good out there, a lot. There’s bad too. Staring at it, looking for too long takes away the time we have in front of us to take responsibility for the little and big issues we all face. By keeping our heads tucked deep into our phones and feeds and likes, we miss the opportunity to create a connection standing, sitting, flying, flapping, or wagging right in front of us. I’m the first to raise my hand and say I am guilty of too much. I’ve even wondered if the beeper wasn’t such a bad idea. The number came up, we had time to look, find a quarter, a phone….all that time….all that time to think about what we were doing.